Amplify Conference at Wheaton College

 

Amplify Conference of Evangelism at Wheaton College, June 28-30, 2016

 

I plan to participate in this conference.

  • WHO IS SPONSORING THE AMPLIFY CONFERENCE?

    The event is sponsored by the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton College. The BGCE exists to lead the conversation on evangelism by training, resourcing, and mobilizing followers of Jesus to share their faith; networking leaders; researching best practices; engaging thought leaders; and launching strategic ministry initiatives.

  • WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF AMPLIFY?

    Many in church leadership positions want to help those in their care to increase their gospel witness and prioritize evangelism. Unfortunately, as our world changes so quickly, strategies for making this happen often cannot keep pace. We are coming together to lead the conversation in evangelism and then implement a renewal of evangelism in our local churches. We will be sharing research, platforming speakers, and conducting breakouts to move the conversation about evangelism and the local church forward. The event will feature a mix of plenary speakers, case studies, research, breakout sessions, and networking times.

  • WHO SHOULD ATTEND AMPLIFY?

    Amplify is for anyone in a church leadership position or in a position outside the local church setting where you are seeking to weave an evangelism ethos into your own life or the lives of others. The conference is intended to equip and inspire you personally and as you lead others in developing a lifestyle of gospel witness.

  • WILL THERE BE FOLLOW UP TO AMPLIFY?

    Amplify is an annual national conference. In between gatherings, we will be producing and sending out evangelism training, research, and leadership resources regularly. We will also be developing networks of leaders who bond together with a vision for becoming ongoing learning communities and cohorts that gather annually at the conference to make progress.

  • More info is avaliable at http://www.amplifyconference.tv/

 

 

 

 

Global Outreach Day May 21

Editors note: This article was first posted by By

Global Outrach Day

Global Outreach Day

Global Outreach Day
May 21
Across the World

There are five million fewer people claiming to be Christians today compared to nine years ago, according to a recent Pew Research Study. This May, millions of Christians are rallying together to change this trend by proactively engaging in conversations about their faith in Jesus Christ.

On May 21, believers across the U.S. will unite through a commitment to share the Gospel with at least one person during Global Outreach Day. Cru, an interdenominational Christian evangelism organization, is supporting Global Outreach Day by encouraging Christians to share their personal stories and introduce God’s story to others.

Global Outreach Day provides Christians with extra confidence to share their faith with others, knowing they are joined in their efforts by millions around the world. In 2015, 1.7 million people made decisions to commit their lives to Jesus as a result of Global Outreach Day efforts, and more than 43.2 million Gospel tracts were distributed.

While some Christians may desire to share their faith but feel unprepared, Cru provides resources and programs tailored for people from all walks of life.

Apostolic Healing vs Local Church Healing

Differences between Evangelistic (or Apostolic) and Pastoral (Local Church) Healing  I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which, I hope, will inaugurate a flood of supernatural healing based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.  What are some differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing? 1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions. 2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living. 3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.  Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well. 4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases. Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues. 5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease. 6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.  Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing. In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23). Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.  7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.  God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.  While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.  This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love. May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

What are the differences between apostolic healing and pastoral healing?

I submit there are differences between apostolic healing and local church (pastoral) healing. When these are understood pastors and local church members will be encouraged, gifts will be released, and a flood of healings will ensue.

I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which is inaugurating a rising tide of supernatural healing in our local church based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.

Seven differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing

1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions.

2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living.

3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.

Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well.

4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases.

Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues.

5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease.

6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing takes place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.

Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie is well today because he took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing.

In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23).

Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.

7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.

God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.

While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.

This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love.

Go here to gain some astounding insights about how churches related to apostles in the New Testament Era.

May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

Can a Church Flourish without an Apostle?

Jim McCracken, Founder of TrueBridge, a family of churches in Minnesota and beyond, answers a pertinent question regarding churches and apostles.

Here’s the question: Can a church flourish without an apostle? Jim  relates with a number of churches. He’s a man with the background and experience to answer the question. He’s observed scores of fellowships over the decades. Let’s listen to the 50 second video.

Want to dig deeper? Check out a definitive book — Local Churches Global Apostles: How Churches Related to Apostles in the New Testament Era and Why It Matters Now

Should Apostles Today Use the Title?

Fred Herzog has a clear and concise answer to this question many are asking. Should apostles today use the title? Some say “Yes,” some say “No.” Here’s Fred’s take on the topic.

 

I have known Fred and his wife Char for about 50 years. They are a great team filled with years of wisdom and love.

Fred has been involved in developing congregations, leadership, and ministry opportunities including a successful ministry of helping individuals gain personal freedom through understanding the ways of God. Fred, along with his team, has started and trained up leadership for over 20 different ministries.

Consistent qualities of Fred’s ministries have included contemporary worship, spiritual counseling, informal services, and team-focused leadership. His aim continues in presenting cutting-edge worship, profound teaching, and discipleship for the advancement of the Kingdom of God in our present generation.

Fred and his wife Char live in Northfield and have 3 adult children.

Are Apostles Alive Today?

What do you say to people that believe that all apostles and prophets died with Peter and Paul? Are Apostles alive today? We asked Steve Fatow this question. Hear  his one minute response.

Are apostles alive today? If you’re watching the video, you’re looking at one!

Steve Fatow was born in New York and raised in a Jewish home in Miami, Florida. In 1970, he heard the Gospel and gave his life completely to Jesus Christ. Transformed by God’s power, Steve immediately felt a call to the ministry. Soon he began to manifest a powerful preaching gift coupled with signs powerfully confirming the word he preached.

In his early years, God gave Steve a clear word that he was called to take the Gospel to the nations. Soon, doors began opening up for him in Central and South America. He began traveling to those countries and holding crusades in every country in Latin America. God began to powerfully bless these crusades with thousands saved and healed to the glory of God.

After pastoring churches in Miami and Florence, Alabama, Steve moved to Knoxville, Tennessee to become pastor of Trinity Chapel. His crusade ministry has steadily grown, not only in Central and South America, but all over the world. Each month these crusades see thousands brought to Christ as well as many miraculous healings. Steve has a powerful prophetic word for his generation which he brings not only to his crusade ministry, but to many local churches in the U.S. and Europe as well. His passion for purity, coupled with his ability to stir people to preach the Gospel, have equipped him mightily as a voice to his generation.

Steve is married to his wife Sandi, an ex drug addict who is also mightily used throughout the United States to minister in prisons as well as churches. They have two daughters and reside in Knoxville, Tennessee where Steve continues to serve as senior pastor of Trinity Chapel.

Find Steve at https://www.facebook.com/steve.fatow

 

Signs of an Apostle

What are the signs of an apostle? Many are asking that question these days? Some folks are not even sure if there are apostles alive in the twenty-first century. We ran into Howard Jackson at a recent conference in Minneapolis. He’s a down-to-earth guy with down-to-earth insight.

We decided to ask Howard, a long time observer and participant in churches of New Testament caliber, “What are the signs of an apostle?” Howard’s answer may surprise you.

By the way, Howard plays a most delightful trumpet!

In this video snippet, Howard inserted no Scripture. If you want Scriptures and a whole lot more about ancient and modern day apostles and prophets, click here.

What are the top two things an apostle can do for the local church?

Steve Fatow offers insightful comments about the ministry of a modern day apostle.

Steve Fatow has been conducting evangelistic and healing crusades in Latin America for over 30 years. He has gained the trust of pastors and ministers in nearly every country in Central and South America.

Along with others, Steve Fatow founded Trinity College of Ministry. Trinity College of Ministry is the product of a long running desire in the hearts of the pastors at Trinity Chapel. For years, in many different forms and in various locations, systematic teaching has been implemented for the purpose of equipping members for the work of the ministry. Now, with the completion of a new facility on a forty-seven acre campus, the vision has taken shape. Faculty and staff were assembled and classes began in May of 2002.

To discover more about this man and his ministry, click here. I thank God the ministry of the apostle continues today.

I learned to relate to apostles the hard way. Personal agony and church crisis sparked my in-depth study of the New Testament. Local Churches Global Apostles contains case studies of every local church in the NT, reveals all 25 NT apostles mentioned, and describes the variety of local church and apostle relationships. Ground-breaking research and surprising conclusions offer fresh perspectives on apostles and elucidate why the early church exploded with growth. Targeted to pastors and church leaders, the book is a brilliant resource for all who yearn to grasp Biblical roots, unleash the Spirit-power of God’s people, and build vibrant churches today.

REVIVAL 2015 WHAT MIGHT IT LOOK LIKE?

 

Revival 2015Revival 2015

More and more prophetic types are saying that revival is imminent. 225 pastors recently met in the Twin Cities to talk and pray about revival. They said the meeting felt like they may be walking through the door.

Revival is God’s business. We don’t serve it up; we respond to a God who causes the wind to blow. And yet we take part in the dance. God brings unity and we maintain it (Eph. 4:3), God engineers revival, but we steward it. Here’s an outlook I would recommend we consider as we walk into the Big One that is upon us.

Knowing the history of revival tells us that it includes some important ingredients, like prayer, but the shape it takes depends upon how the wind is blowing. 2015 looks different from 1905, and even the Jesus revival of the 1970s. The internet could be used to great advantage in a viral culture. When people are healed of incurable diseases and 200,000 witness it instead of a hundred, we thank God for the internet!

What if…

  • As many people came to faith in Starbuck’s as at the altar? We have been transforming the marketplace into the ministry center the last two decades. In the ‘70s, we were still stuck at church. Some today may tarry at the altar; others at the coffee shop. Whatever works! Some would rather meet us on their turf than ours. Hey, that’s what the word “go” means.
  • What if no-names in every healthy church replaced the famous revivalist preacher? Bound to happen. We have enough churches ripe for revival that will spring into action. Having no-names share in leading the revival puts the right face before people—Jesus.
  • What if the revival was embraced by many churches, and revival turned into vival? Visitation becomes habitation, and God decides to stick around. The impact is long-term, because we move from a revival culture to a pastoral culture.
  • What if we were unable to pinpoint where it started? Then we would conclude it started in heaven. If it breaks out in many places simultaneously, we don’t have people flocking to a place but a church flocking to the people. Cool!
  • What if folks keep their hands off it, don’t try to own it but steward it as a move of God? Revivals are not affiliated with any denomination. Churches that know revival is a part of biblical and American history are more willing to embrace current revivals.
  • What if local churches had their own spin on the revival, each responding according to its own needs? Can a revival take on the flavor of the church receiving it? Hope so.
  • What if revival meetings were training sessions to take it to them? Few will come to us. (We’re doing it at our house, starting June 1st ).

Important ingredients:

  1. Extraordinary prayer. Down through history, prayer has been the single most important catalyst for revival. Pray for humility, discernment, unity and for multitudes swept into the kingdom. Join with others!
  2. Multi-generations. Malachi 4:5,6 waits to be fulfilled. An un-fathered generation stands under a curse. This revival will include a Father blessing from heaven and physical fathers renewed to put children above career.
  3. Five-fold ministry. We didn’t know a couple decades ago that the pastoral could be encouraged by the apostolic and the prophetic strengthening the evangelistic.
  4. Wider participation, including Catholics and Orthodox.

Journey to Authenticity with Sonny Misar

Journey to authenticity with Sonny Misar

Journey to authenticity with Sonny Misar

Sonny Misar is a treasure trove of apostolic and pastoral wisdom. His teachings regarding “surrender” and “brokenness” deftly tie puzzling pieces of life together for believers.