4 Trademarks of a New Testament Apostolic Church

ken Malone Apostolic Church

Ken Malone Apostolic Church


4 Trademarks of a New Testament Apostolic Church

Publisher’s note: Ken Malone is being used by God to mobilize the body of Christ throughout Florida and the nation. After being a pastor for 24 years, Ken has recently stepped down from a pastoral position which has allowed God to launch Ken into his apostolic role. He is an ordained minister and serves as the founder of Forerunner School and Ministry, Inc. and serves on the board of Dutch Sheets Ministries. Ken also serves as one of the leaders of Network Ekklesia International, an Apostolic Network founded by Dutch Sheets. Ken walks in a governmental apostolic mantle that releases the body of Christ into their destiny. He also ministers with a prophetic, seer anointing which enables him to identify activate and release redemptive gifts in individuals, churches and cities.

These four things signify what a New Testament Apostolic church should look like.

The role model the Lord left us for the church is found in the book of Acts. He didn’t leave any other model. Today our congregation life is filled with programs and clutter that remove us from being a book of Acts people.

Trademark: A distinctive feature or characteristic that serves to identify the maker or originator.

Wow, what a definition. Now let’s look at some of the characteristics that identify our Maker:

1. Outpouring of His Spirit – Acts 2 released the promise of Joel that His Spirit would be poured out on all. It is God living in us and among us. He puts His life inside us, and through that life, we converse and have relationship with the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. And it shall be in the last days, God says, “That I will pour forth of My Spirit upon all mankind” (Acts 2:17), God loves relationship. How are you relating to Him? Begin again to talk to God and read His Word. His life will ignite within you.

2. Signs, wonders, miracles and healing – At the gate Beautiful, a man who was lame from His mother’s womb was miraculously healed. This marked the beginning of miracles through the hands of the apostles. It is a trademark left to us so that we would also operate in the miracle-working ministry of Christ. Miracles are the marks of a New Testament Apostolic Church. The signs of a true apostle were performed among you with all perseverance, by signs and wonders and miracles (2 Cor. 12:12).

3. Dreams, visions and the prophetic – Do you dream with the Lord? Did you know the Lord dreams? He releases His dreams, visions and prophetic word to His people. I have spent most of my life going after the voice of the Lord. Even to this day I long to hear Him speak. Acts 2 marks us as a people, when filled with the Holy Ghost will have visions, dreams and prophetic words.

“And your sons and daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions and your old men shall dream dreams” (Acts 2:17, MEV).

I was sharing a dream with Lou Engle, and he said to me, “Follow the dream, follow the dream.” That’s the way the book of Acts church operated—not through programs, but through dreams, visions and the prophetic word. Dream again! Ask the Lord to give you His dreams, visions and prophetic word. (Note: True prophetic words, dreams and visions will be within the integrity of God’s written word.)

4. Harvest – This is a signpost to us. In Acts 2, the results of His Holy Spirit being poured out was 3,000 souls coming to the Lord through believing in Him. It happened again in Acts 3 with the results of 5,000 coming to the Lord through the Lord healing the man at the Beautiful Gate. Let’s raise the bar. This is the mark of revival. Several years ago, a lady asked me to attend the revival meetings going on at their church for the last 30 days. I was interested in what was going on, so I asked, “What’s happening?” She said, “Many are being blessed and touched by God.” Then I asked, “Any souls being saved?” She responded, “No.”

They were being renewed, which we all need, but this is not what I call Awakening. Recently, there have been thousands saved in Williamson, West Virginia. This began a little over a month ago when a no-name evangelist by the name of Matt Hartley from Tennessee came into Williamson for a three-day meeting but the meetings just kept going.

Revival broke out, however, when the evangelist spoke in the school and thousands of students were saved. Pastor Mitch Bias, with the regional Church of God in Delbarton, said prayer, plus desperation, has paved the way for this spiritual breakthrough, especially among the young people. Now that’s the trademark I’m looking for.

Let’s lead someone to Jesus, whether it’s 1 or 1,000. It’s a sign of real revival.

Publisher’s note: These 4 foundational aspects of a New Testament apostolic church plus much more are included in my book — Local Churches Global Apostles: How Churches Related to Apostles in the New Testament Era and Why It Matters Now

Forge One Day BiVo Training (June 25) OutreachMagazine.com

bi-vocational minister

bi-vocational minister

Hugh Halter hosts this workshop for church planters and pastors who are bi-vocational or considering it.

Source: Forge One Day BiVo Training (June 25) OutreachMagazine.com  

 

At the Church of the Living Water we are searching for ways to support mission workers and evangelists. This training may help.

Curiosity Evangelism

Publisher’s note: Curiosity Evangelism — great article. I didn’t write it and I don’t know who did. Nevertheless, it can help a lot of us “chicken evangelists” get started.

Recently I came home to our apartment building to find my neighbor Tanner sitting on the steps having a cigarette. I stopped to talk for a few minutes. I had been thinking that it would be nice to talk with Tanner about faith, but I never knew quite how to start that conversation (a pretty common feeling for most of us, I think).

That night was different, though. I realized that my motivation for wanting to talk with him about faith was not because I should. I really wanted to know about his spiritual life.

In a word, I was curious.
“Do you have any spiritual beliefs? I’m a Christian, and I find that I’m really curious about other peoples’ faith journeys.”
He answered candidly about his past experiences in church, and talked at length about the reasons why he stopped being involved several years back.

As this conversation was happening, I realized that I had just stumbled across a breakthrough in my own ability to talk about spiritual things with people.

If I am genuinely curious about people, if I am interested in their lives, then naturally (since I am a spiritual person) that will mean I am curious about their spiritual lives.
That has led to some really great spiritual conversations with people.

Curiosity is powerful.
When I’m curious about something, I’m motivated to learn about it.
I’m willing to expend energy, or maybe even money, on it.
I spend time thinking about it.
I try to get other people thinking and talking about it.

I’ve found that when I’m curious about a person, that is a big motivator to encourage me to talk with them and figure out where they are in life and where they are spiritually.
So often we hear teaching that we should share our faith with other people, because it’s the right thing to do. Because it’s what we’re supposed to do. Of course that’s true. But I’ve found that the most authentic and meaningful conversations I’ve had about faith were the result of me simply being curious about that person’s life and spirituality.

Most people like to talk about themselves, and a few honest questions about their life can really deepen a casual friendship and open the door to hear their spiritual story.

Who are you curious about?

For stories about how chicken evangelism works, go here.

Amplify Conference at Wheaton College

 

Amplify Conference of Evangelism at Wheaton College, June 28-30, 2016

 

I plan to participate in this conference.

  • WHO IS SPONSORING THE AMPLIFY CONFERENCE?

    The event is sponsored by the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton College. The BGCE exists to lead the conversation on evangelism by training, resourcing, and mobilizing followers of Jesus to share their faith; networking leaders; researching best practices; engaging thought leaders; and launching strategic ministry initiatives.

  • WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF AMPLIFY?

    Many in church leadership positions want to help those in their care to increase their gospel witness and prioritize evangelism. Unfortunately, as our world changes so quickly, strategies for making this happen often cannot keep pace. We are coming together to lead the conversation in evangelism and then implement a renewal of evangelism in our local churches. We will be sharing research, platforming speakers, and conducting breakouts to move the conversation about evangelism and the local church forward. The event will feature a mix of plenary speakers, case studies, research, breakout sessions, and networking times.

  • WHO SHOULD ATTEND AMPLIFY?

    Amplify is for anyone in a church leadership position or in a position outside the local church setting where you are seeking to weave an evangelism ethos into your own life or the lives of others. The conference is intended to equip and inspire you personally and as you lead others in developing a lifestyle of gospel witness.

  • WILL THERE BE FOLLOW UP TO AMPLIFY?

    Amplify is an annual national conference. In between gatherings, we will be producing and sending out evangelism training, research, and leadership resources regularly. We will also be developing networks of leaders who bond together with a vision for becoming ongoing learning communities and cohorts that gather annually at the conference to make progress.

  • More info is avaliable at http://www.amplifyconference.tv/

 

 

 

 

The Changing Face of Evangelism

 

Editor’s note: The  following post is written by Beth Seversen.

Beth Seversen is the denominational leader for evangelism in the Evangelical Covenant Church and a Billy Graham Research Scholar. Beth is currently pursuing a doctorate in Intercultural Studies at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. She is researching emerging adults and the factors that make churches effective reaching them.

16Feature-The-Changing-Face-of-Evangelism-0517

Two critical ways evangelism can adapt to cultural shifts.

This post is part of a series called Amplifying Evangelism. Don’t miss the Amplify Conference on evangelism, June 28-30 at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

History recounts numerous missional movements that have sought to reach people far from God through cultural accommodation. The Jesuit mission to China and St. Patrick’s Celtic way of evangelism are two examples of how the missionary church practiced cultural adaptation to further God’s mission.

George Hunter’s 2010 work on the Celtic mission informs us that Patrick and his men engaged the Celtic imagination in presenting the gospel through the creative arts of story and song and drama, adapting their mission to pagan culture to induce Celtic awakening. Similarly, to be effective in the contemporary world, evangelism methodologies in the West are adapting to Western culture shifts. Here are two examples.

Encounter vs. Information

Effective evangelism emphasizes experience over information in an increasingly post-Christian and postmodern context. In previous generations, evangelism methods appealed to reason and then called for a commitment to Christ based on a logical presentation of the gospel.

Some missional communities reverse the order today and find translating the gospel to contemporary cultures is more fruitful when an encounter with God precedes explanation about God. In such contexts, non-Christians are led to experience God before receiving a download of information about God.

Experiencing God may take the form of emotional healing from harm imposed by others or from personal addiction. For instance, Christians ministering at Burning Man (a self-expression and arts festival that annually draws some 60,000 people, many of them millennials) adapt the cultural tools of the festival to reach “Burners” through encounter.

Burning Man is an experimental society and participants dabble in everything from drug-induced altered states of consciousness—often associated with artistic creativity—to consciousness-raising projects. Personal and global transformation are explicit goals of Burning Man, as is taking responsibility in working toward a greater future.

Christian groups at Burning Man provide a “menu” of spiritual experiences to festival participants who show up at their camps. Dream interpretation and heart “massage” are popular among young adult Burners who encounter God through healing and listening prayer while believers help them identify their spiritual blockages, unresolved wounds, brokenness and addictions.

Scripts vs. Spiritual Conversations

Similar to the previous generation’s evangelism methodology of information download, in the past people often relied on formulaic presentations of the gospel. Evangelistic scripts like “The Four Spiritual Laws” and “Steps to Peace with God” were found to be evangelistically fruitful.

The previous Christian generation might assume that their non-Christian audience shared their belief and trust in absolute facts, observations and logic, and therefore tended to approach evangelism with argumentation, evidence and reason. Those assumptions are not always accurate today.

Cultural observers note that as culture shifts to more postmodern ways of thinking, non-Christian audiences no longer assume there is absolute truth, but that truth is biased and facts are socially constructed based on assumption.

What’s more, people today are less interested in being “taught” when they can become “experts” by educating themselves through the Internet. Popular culture emphasizes discovery, journey and narrative over apologetics, debate and persuasion. Today, fruitful evangelism looks more like story than propositional truth, telling God’s story and explaining how our own story fits in with God’s larger mission.

Significantly, younger generations don’t want a script or even a verse—but they do want to converse! Recent studies by Pew Research Center and the American Religious Identification Survey on the “Rise of the Nones” assure us that even those who are religiously unaffiliated generally still believe in God, pray frequently, enjoy community and often care about significant causes like human trafficking—providing plenty of opportunities for relational evangelism and spiritual conversations.

Encounter and story are two ways evangelism is effectively adapting to contemporary culture.

 

6 Most Influential Evangelism Sites

Influential Evangelism Sites

Influential Evangelism Sites

What are the Top 6 Most Influential Evangelism Sites in My Life? Most of us need help with personal evangelism. If you are like “most of us,” try one or more of these sites. If you’re stuck in regard to personal evangelism, I especially recommend the first or the last of the six.

Evantell.org

Alongside the giants in this list, most people have never heard of Evantell. Yet they highly impacted my life and understanding of evangelism. First, they defined the gospel for me like no one else. Based on 1 Corinthians 15:1-6:  “Jesus Christ died for our sins and rose from the dead.” Second, Evantell taught me how to biblically pray for the lost.

 

 

Campus Crusade

Thank God for Bill Bright. In the 1960’s the hottest training team around was Campus Crusade for Christ. I gained from the training and led numbers of students to Christ. Campus Crusade has expended and adapted to change over the years. Some people may try to tell us, the “old” approach doesn’t work anymore, but don’t let that throw you off. The Four Spiritual Laws still work. The online presence is now called “cru,’ and can be located at cru.org.

 

Luis Palau

Luis Palau led an area wide evangelistic campaign in the Quad Cities (Moline, Davenport, Rock island and Bettendorf) some years ago. One line from Dr. Palau’s training  may have wavered, but never left me. “Lord, stamp eternity on my eyelids.” Go to luispalau.org

 

Billy Graham

Influential because it’s always been there as long as I can remember.  Yet,  I’m including Billy Graham on this list of influential evangelism sites for a peculiar and very current reason. Their follow-up tracts (which appear to be a knock-off of the Four Spiritual Laws) fit into my wallet better than any other. How often I have witnessed with a man and then had no tract to leave in his hand. If you want a good wallet-sized tract, Go to BillyGraham.org.

 

Outreach Magazine

This is a newcomer to my list. I include it primarily because of the articles by Thom Rainier. Well worth listening to. This author is one of the foremost evangelism and church growth thinkers today. You can access them at Outreachmagazine.com

 

 

Chicken Evangelism

Do you think I’m joking? Not on your life! Stories impact. This is an influential evangelism site because it tells simple stories of personal evangelism. Where else can you find so many stories of personal evangelism? Or any stories for that matter? I did a search of the top 100 evangelism sites on google. I was trying to find examples – stories, if you will – of personal evangelism. I found only one site in the top 100 with an example of personal evangelism. Many sites talk about evangelism and tell how to do it, but ChickenEvangelism.com  inspires by example.

 

Have you got a site that is actually helping lead people to salvation in personal evangelism? Pass it on in the comment section.

 

If you have led someone to salvation by means of personal evangelism, let the world know. Inspire others by telling your story.

 

 

Global Outreach Day May 21

Editors note: This article was first posted by By

Global Outrach Day

Global Outreach Day

Global Outreach Day
May 21
Across the World

There are five million fewer people claiming to be Christians today compared to nine years ago, according to a recent Pew Research Study. This May, millions of Christians are rallying together to change this trend by proactively engaging in conversations about their faith in Jesus Christ.

On May 21, believers across the U.S. will unite through a commitment to share the Gospel with at least one person during Global Outreach Day. Cru, an interdenominational Christian evangelism organization, is supporting Global Outreach Day by encouraging Christians to share their personal stories and introduce God’s story to others.

Global Outreach Day provides Christians with extra confidence to share their faith with others, knowing they are joined in their efforts by millions around the world. In 2015, 1.7 million people made decisions to commit their lives to Jesus as a result of Global Outreach Day efforts, and more than 43.2 million Gospel tracts were distributed.

While some Christians may desire to share their faith but feel unprepared, Cru provides resources and programs tailored for people from all walks of life.

Fun to Witness 1

Fun to Witness

Fun to Witness

In Seattle I was trying to buy gas at a Costco store.  Unfortunately, my card didn’t work.  An attendant came over and offered to help.  With his instructions, the gas began to flow and I was left for the 3 minute fill with a helpful attendant.

“Have you received Jesus Christ into your life?” I queried.  “Yes, I have!” came his cheery response.  “And this job is a result of my faith.  I was out of work and needed a job.  God answered my prayers and this job suddenly popped open.  They selected me and I really enjoy what I’m doing.  I get to help people like you all day long.”

“That’s great,” I remarked.  ”Your faith really shows.”  He helped me in my moment of need and I was able to encourage him.  We parted with the happy satisfaction of being friends and brothers.

Apostolic Healing vs Local Church Healing

Differences between Evangelistic (or Apostolic) and Pastoral (Local Church) Healing  I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which, I hope, will inaugurate a flood of supernatural healing based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.  What are some differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing? 1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions. 2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living. 3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.  Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well. 4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases. Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues. 5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease. 6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.  Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing. In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23). Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.  7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.  God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.  While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.  This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love. May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

What are the differences between apostolic healing and pastoral healing?

I submit there are differences between apostolic healing and local church (pastoral) healing. When these are understood pastors and local church members will be encouraged, gifts will be released, and a flood of healings will ensue.

I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which is inaugurating a rising tide of supernatural healing in our local church based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.

Seven differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing

1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions.

2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living.

3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.

Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well.

4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases.

Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues.

5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease.

6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing takes place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.

Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie is well today because he took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing.

In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23).

Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.

7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.

God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.

While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.

This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love.

Go here to gain some astounding insights about how churches related to apostles in the New Testament Era.

May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

God Heals: Tumors Disappear

Bernie Blaskowski, Ministry Team Leader

Bernie Blaskowski, Ministry Team Leader

God heals: tumors disappear. Bernie Blaskowski, leader of the Ministry Team at The Church of the Living Water in Muscatine, obviously enjoys relating this healing experience. The video lasts only 55 seconds.

 

If you prefer to read instead of viewing the video, here is the transcript.

Pastor Mark in the background: Again, I’m so thankful for our Prayer Ministry team. You guys just do great things… by God’s power.

Bernie: Last Sunday after church…..our Prayer Ministry…. where we pray for people. Diane can I… can you stand please? This is a really fun deal, Diane… when she came up for prayer… I think you can..could actually see the swelling on the left side of her neck, before we started to pray. After we were done praying,… it was gone…. It was gone. I was.. I mean… I could….I could visually see the difference! Between the time we started praying and the time we got done. I mean… Do you want to add somethings to that?

Diane: Yes! Praise the Lord!

God Heals

God is visiting churches in Muscatine. The Church of the Living Water is only one of many excellent Muscatine area fellowships. If you need physical healing, find a church that can stand with you in faith, prayer, and natural counsel to bring the healing. God heals tumors, cancers, heart disease, headaches, etc. There is no limit to what God can do. I myself have been healed of cancer by the power of God plus natural changes.

God Heals Cancer

For the next few days, you can get FREE access to the 9 part video series The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest.  You may save someone’s life by  clicking here.
 

Mark