Apostolic Healing vs Local Church Healing

Differences between Evangelistic (or Apostolic) and Pastoral (Local Church) Healing  I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which, I hope, will inaugurate a flood of supernatural healing based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.  What are some differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing? 1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions. 2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living. 3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.  Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well. 4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases. Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues. 5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease. 6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.  Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing. In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23). Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.  7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.  God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.  While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.  This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love. May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

What are the differences between apostolic healing and pastoral healing?

I submit there are differences between apostolic healing and local church (pastoral) healing. When these are understood pastors and local church members will be encouraged, gifts will be released, and a flood of healings will ensue.

I’m writing to encourage pastors and church members. We often think healing should look like the miracles in the Bible. We tend to get discouraged when things turn out differently than expected. I’m offering a fresh paradigm which is inaugurating a rising tide of supernatural healing in our local church based on a clearer understanding of God and the Bible.

Seven differences between evangelistic or apostolic healing and pastoral (local church) healing

1 God has given a wonderful, yet distinct, anointing to pastors and local church members that differs from evangelists and apostles. For example, churches have a special grace to care for the flock of God on a long-term basis. On the other hand, evangelists and apostles generally have the gift of miracles, a gift which most pastors lack. It only makes sense that the different gifts and anointings lead to differences in the way healing functions.

2 The evangelistic and apostolic ministries are linked primarily to justification. Their burden is to see unbelievers saved and brought into God’s kingdom. On the other hand, pastoral healing is linked primarily to sanctification. The pastor’s burden is to see believers grow in kingdom living.

3 Healing in the Bible (Jesus Christ being the chief apostle and example of an evangelist) is generally immediate. Pastoral healing may be immediate, yet is often gradual. Pastoral healing often begins as a “seed” in the inner man, in the spirit, and must be fueled by faith in order to manifest in the body. Faith without works is dead. I’m convinced many are healed, but are not aware of it because they expect an immediate physical manifestation.

Related to this issue of immediate verses gradual healing is the fact that the itinerant evangelist often has one opportunity to bring healing; the pastor can pray repeatedly for a sick man until he gets well.

4 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the spiritual condition of the diseased person. Consider Matthew 4:23 where Jesus was “going about in all Galilee . . . healing very kind of disease and every kind of sickness among the people.” Imagine all the varied spiritual conditions of those He healed. Some were good men; some may have been wife-beaters. Some may have been homosexuals, some child neglectors, some adulterers or fornicators. Yet Jesus healed them all without attempting to deal with the causes of pains or diseases.

Pastoral healing in the local church must often deal with the spiritual condition of the sufferer. Notice Pastor James in 5:16, “Confess your sins one to another . . . so that you may be healed.” Forgiveness, repentance, reconciliation are conditions for health in the local church. The pastor and the local church are uniquely qualified to deal with such issues.

5 Evangelistic and apostolic healing take place regardless of the cause of the disease. Traveling ministries generally don’t have time nor grace to deal with the causes of disease. Pastoral healing must often take into account the spiritual, psychological, and emotional causes of disease. Some studies show 80 percent of hospital beds are filled by people with emotionally induced sickness. Unresolved anxiety is a major contributor to both cancer and heart-disease. Pastors must initiate long-term solutions by dealing with underlying causes of disease.

6 Again, evangelistic and apostolic healing takes place regardless of the cause of the disease. Pastors need to identify and help people with both the natural causes and the natural remedies of disease. Toxic overload, obesity, lack of exercise, etc. are all natural causes of disease. People may get healed, but unless the natural cause of sickness is dealt with, the sickness often returns.

Bernie Blaskowski is an example of local church healing from heart disease. His health and healing today resulted from a series of processes over time. Lifestyle change, weight loss, medical intervention, and prayer, all played a role. Perhaps most significant of all, Bernie is well today because he took personal responsibility for his health which resulted in his dramatic healing.

In his pastoral epistle Paul instructs Timothy to “use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent aliments (I Timothy 5:23).

Can you imagine Jesus in the middle of the multitude advising, “Drink more grape juice and you will be healed.” Of course not. The evangelistic and pastoral gifts are not the same. Each is wonderful, each is from God, and each is distinct.

7 Apostles and evangelists are given strong healing ministries to bring unsaved people into the kingdom of God. God requires nothing from unbelievers except openness to Christ.

God gives pastors strong healing ministries to help believers grow up as kingdom people. God expects His children to grow up in faith and take personal responsibility for their own healing.

While this article identifies distinctions between various ministries, the differences are not absolute. Evangelists or apostles may occasionally oversee a long-term healing process for some individual. Pastors and local churches also experience immediate and dramatic miracles of healing. In fact, the gift of miracles (1 Cor 12:10) is a local church ministry and needs to be developed in New Testament churches.

This article identifies distinctions between various ministries, yet there are also similarities. All healing is from God. All stem from the cross of Christ, and all need to be motivated by God’s love.

Go here to gain some astounding insights about how churches related to apostles in the New Testament Era.

May we be encouraged by the calling God has given to each. May we see a flood of divine healing released in and through the church to the glory of God!

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